Net zero energy analysis and energy conversion of sustainable residential building in Muscat, Oman

  • Muthuraman Subbiah Department of Engineering, University of Technology and Applied Sciences, Muscat 133, Oman
  • Hafiz Zafar Sharif Department of Engineering, University of Technology and Applied Sciences, Muscat 133, Oman
  • Sivaraj Murugan Department of Mechanical Engineering, Rohini College of Engineering and Technology, Tamilnadu 629401, India
  • Kumar Ayyappan Department of Applied Sciences, Amrita College of Engineering and Technology, Tamilnadu 629901, India
Ariticle ID: 1231
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Keywords: sustainable buildings; energy conservation; ecohouse; energy demand; Net Zero energy

Abstract

The building sector is the predominant consumer of primary energy globally. The building sector accounts for around 40% of global energy production.Net Zero Energy Buildings (NZEBs) are highly suggested by energy experts as an effective option to alleviate the strain on primary energy sources caused by the building sector. The disparity between energy performance predictions provided during the design phase and the actual energy performance of residential buildings is mostly attributed to a limited comprehension of the components that influence energy consumption and the constraints of whole building simulation software. The objective of this research was to perform a comparison analysis of the expected and actual energy consumption of a prototype net-zero energy house built at the University of Technology and Applied Sciences in Muscat. The Hourly Analysis Programme (HAP V4.2) was utilised to forecast the energy consumption of a Net Zero Energy Building (NZEB) at HCT, taking into account the availability of an Energy Recovery Ventilator (ERV) and the absence of an ERV. The newly built house underwent a one-month testing phase to fulfil many duties according to competition regulations. One of the main goals was to generate on-site energy through photovoltaic panels, producing an amount proportional to the energy consumed by the house. Upon comparing the actual energy consumption data with the simulated result, it was noticed that the actual energy demand of the house was around 20% lower than the prediction made by the simulation tool.

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Published
2024-05-13
How to Cite
Subbiah, M., Sharif, H. Z., Murugan, S., & Ayyappan, K. (2024). Net zero energy analysis and energy conversion of sustainable residential building in Muscat, Oman. Building Engineering, 2(1), 1231. https://doi.org/10.59400/be.v2i1.1231
Section
Article

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