Triggering factors affecting primary school children in Lebanon: A pilot cross-sectional study

  • Diana Ghanem Clinical and Epidemiological Research Laboratory, Faculty of Pharmacy, Lebanese University, Hadat 1500, Lebanon
  • Sarah Tarhini Clinical and Epidemiological Research Laboratory, Faculty of Pharmacy, Lebanese University, Hadat 1500, Lebanon
  • Marwa Manana Clinical and Epidemiological Research Laboratory, Faculty of Pharmacy, Lebanese University, Hadat 1500, Lebanon
  • Sanaa Awada Clinical and Epidemiological Research Laboratory, Faculty of Pharmacy, Lebanese University, Hadat 1500, Lebanon
  • Roula Bou Assi Clinical and Epidemiological Research Laboratory, Faculty of Pharmacy, Lebanese University, Hadat 1500, Lebanon
  • Assem El-Kak Clinical and Epidemiological Research Laboratory, Faculty of Pharmacy, Lebanese University, Hadat 1500, Lebanon
  • Georges Hatem Clinical and Epidemiological Research Laboratory, Faculty of Pharmacy, Lebanese University, Hadat 1500, Lebanon; EPI Unit-Institute of Public Health, University of Porto, Rua das Taipas, n° 135, 4050–600 Porto, Portugal
Ariticle ID: 541
77 Views, 60 PDF Downloads
Keywords: triggers; schoolchildren; academic; behavioral; social; environmental

Abstract

Purpose: Academic pressures, the fear of failure, social expectations, and high expectations from parents or teachers can all contribute to performance-related stress or anxiety in children. This study aims to assess the triggers encountered by primary schoolchildren and examine the interrelatedness between them and the characteristics of the students. Methods: A pilot cross-sectional study targeted primary school children over two months. Two pharmacists and a psychologist collected data using a standardized survey. Students were asked to assess their social (10 statements), behavioral (10 statements), environmental (10 statements), and academic (16 statements) triggers. Results: Environmental triggers had the highest score (4.92 (1.92)), followed by behavioral triggers (4.21 (1.70)). Social triggers were the least reported (3.52 (1.59)). After adjusting for covariates, age, sex, and grade did not affect the academic triggers of the students (p > 0.05), while having divorced or separated parents significantly increased these triggers (B = 0.22; p = 0.025). The social triggers and stressors significantly decreased (B = −0.28; p = 0.003) per grade increase. In contrast, having divorced parents significantly increased these scores (B = 0.21; p = 0.025). Environmental triggers significantly decreased per increase of one year in age (B = −0.23; p = 0.013), with the same pattern observed for the overall trigger scores (B = −0.28; p = 0.003). Conclusion: Promoting open communication, creating an inclusive environment establishing achievable academic goals, and regular follow-up with students can be effective strategies to reduce school triggers among those at high risk.

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Published
2024-04-17
How to Cite
Ghanem, D., Tarhini, S., Manana, M., Awada, S., Assi, R. B., El-Kak, A., & Hatem, G. (2024). Triggering factors affecting primary school children in Lebanon: A pilot cross-sectional study. Forum for Education Studies, 2(2), 541. https://doi.org/10.59400/fes.v2i2.541
Section
Article

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