Latest Articles

  • Open Access

    Article

    Article ID: 541

    Triggering factors affecting primary school children in Lebanon: A pilot cross-sectional study

    by Diana Ghanem, Sarah Tarhini, Marwa Manana, Sanaa Awada, Roula Bou Assi, Assem El-Kak, Georges Hatem

    Forum for Education Studies, Vol.2, No.2, 2024; 47 Views, 38 PDF Downloads

    Purpose: Academic pressures, the fear of failure, social expectations, and high expectations from parents or teachers can all contribute to performance-related stress or anxiety in children. This study aims to assess the triggers encountered by primary schoolchildren and examine the interrelatedness between them and the characteristics of the students. Methods: A pilot cross-sectional study targeted primary school children over two months. Two pharmacists and a psychologist collected data using a standardized survey. Students were asked to assess their social (10 statements), behavioral (10 statements), environmental (10 statements), and academic (16 statements) triggers. Results: Environmental triggers had the highest score (4.92 (1.92)), followed by behavioral triggers (4.21 (1.70)). Social triggers were the least reported (3.52 (1.59)). After adjusting for covariates, age, sex, and grade did not affect the academic triggers of the students ( p > 0.05), while having divorced or separated parents significantly increased these triggers ( B = 0.22; p = 0.025). The social triggers and stressors significantly decreased ( B = −0.28; p = 0.003) per grade increase. In contrast, having divorced parents significantly increased these scores ( B = 0.21; p = 0.025). Environmental triggers significantly decreased per increase of one year in age ( B = −0.23; p = 0.013), with the same pattern observed for the overall trigger scores ( B = −0.28; p = 0.003). Conclusion: Promoting open communication, creating an inclusive environment establishing achievable academic goals, and regular follow-up with students can be effective strategies to reduce school triggers among those at high risk.

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  • Open Access

    Article

    Article ID: 555

    Engineering students’ thoughts on teamwork and approaches to solving a problem with an underperforming member

    by Tanju Deveci, İdris Bedirhanoğlu

    Forum for Education Studies, Vol.2, No.2, 2024; 42 Views, 26 PDF Downloads

    Engineering programs have to develop students’ teamwork skills. However, the onus on content specialists to teach teamwork skills may be challenging partly because of students’ negative attitudes towards and experiences with teamwork. This study investigated 295 engineering students’ thoughts on teamwork and the strategies they used to solve problems with underperforming team members. Data were collected using a survey and a discourse completion task. The results revealed that among the key reasons why the students liked such activities was the exchange of information and experience, increased quantity and quality of work, and interpersonal communication. However, they indicated lack of harmony, social loafing, lack of attention paid to tasks, and individual approaches to learning as reasons for skepticism about teamwork. As to problem-solving strategies, emphatic inquiry and judgmental questioning were most common. Based on these results, we suggest that engineering faculty collaborate with communication instructors in planning and executing soft-skills training for students. Engineering faculty should also be provided with technical support for the incorporation of teamwork activities in virtual environments.

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  • Open Access

    Article

    Article ID: 569

    The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the soft skills of lecturers

    by Afam Uzorka, David Makumbi, Kagezi Kalabuki

    Forum for Education Studies, Vol.2, No.2, 2024; 24 Views, 15 PDF Downloads

    Education institutions quickly made the switch to remote teaching and learning because of the COVID-19 pandemic’s extraordinary problems. This study intends to investigate how the pandemic has affected lecturers’ soft skills, which are vital non-technical and interpersonal skills such as efficient communication, teamwork, adaptation, empathy, problem-solving, and leadership. Data were gathered from lecturers who had firsthand experience with the change to remote teaching through a qualitative study methodology that included interviews and focus group discussions. The research shows that lecturers used new tools, modified their teaching methods, and navigated the virtual environment with amazing flexibility and adaptation. Communication skills improved as lecturers used digital tools to interact with students and offer support. With lecturers attending to academic demands and emotional well-being, empathy and student assistance emerged as crucial. Through creative virtual methods, cooperation and teamwork were promoted. To overcome obstacles, problem-solving skills were used. The study advances knowledge about how the pandemic affected lecturers’ soft skills. The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly changed how instructors use their soft skills. Rapid technology advancement, improved communication abilities, adaptability and flexibility, student support and empathy, and teamwork have all been identified as major areas of change. To successfully adapt to changing educational environments and guarantee the delivery of high-quality education, lecturers will need to further develop these soft skills in the future. By accepting these adjustments, lecturers may not only deal with the difficulties caused by the pandemic but also create a future-focused, welcoming learning atmosphere for their students. Future research should focus on long-term effects, quantitative validation of findings, and evaluation of interventions to improve lecturers’ soft skills in distance learning. In light of changing educational environments, such research can promote lecturers’ professional growth and inform pedagogical methods.

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  • Open Access

    Article

    Article ID: 1228

    A new canvas of learning: Enhancing formal analysis skills in AP art history through AI-generated Islamic art

    by Krista Carpino, James Hutson

    Forum for Education Studies, Vol.2, No.2, 2024; 41 Views, 15 PDF Downloads

    This study explores the use of AI art generators to enhance formal analysis skills in AP Art History students, with a focus on Islamic Art and Architecture. Students, often entering the course with high academic achievements, find the unique challenge of articulating detailed visual descriptions of artworks. The study’s approach involves using AI image-generation websites, like wepik.com, where students create AI images resembling Islamic artworks studied in class. This method aims to refine their descriptive skills, focusing on visual evidence rather than relying on identifying details. The choice of Islamic Art, markedly different from other historical periods covered in the curriculum, is intended to boost retention and learning engagement. The results show that students were more successful in describing architectural artworks compared to two-dimensional narrative pieces, with limited site access and the need for iterative description refinement being key challenges. Successful attempts were marked by precise vocabulary usage and detailed descriptions, resulting in AI images closely matching the original artworks. In contrast, less successful attempts revealed deficiencies in comprehensive and detailed descriptions, particularly in narrative artworks. These outcomes highlight the potential and limitations of AI tools in art history education, suggesting that their effectiveness depends largely on the depth and precision of student inputs. The study not only demonstrates the innovative application of AI in education but also underscores the importance of detailed visual analysis, pointing towards future enhancements in AI-assisted educational methodologies.

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  • Open Access

    Article

    Article ID: 566

    Techno-Pedagogical Competency among teachers in relation to their attitude towards teaching

    by Deepika Chauhan

    Forum for Education Studies, Vol.2, No.2, 2024; 50 Views, 49 PDF Downloads

    The purpose of this study is to determining the Techno-Pedagogical Competency and attitude towards teaching of teachers from selected colleges in Gurgaon District. A normative survey method was adopted in this stage. A sample of 190 teachers were selected from various colleges. The study found that the level of Techno-Pedagogical Competency and the teachers’ possessed a favourable attitude towards teaching. Further, it was found that there exists significant difference in Techno-Pedagogical Competency and attitude towards teaching mean score among teachers with respect to gender, locality, teaching experience and type of institutions. Further, it can be revealed that there was a significant positive correlation between Techno-Pedagogical Competency and attitude towards teaching. Overall, this study provides valuable insights into the current state of Techno-Pedagogical Competency and attitude towards teaching among teachers in Gurgaon District. The findings suggest that the teachers in the region have a good grasp of using technology for pedagogical purposes and hold a positive outlook towards their teaching profession. The results also highlight the importance of considering demographic factors when analyzing teachers’ competency and attitude.

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  • Open Access

    Article

    Article ID: 1262

    Qualitative research: Defining features and guiding principles

    by Md. Saiful Alam, Adelina Asmawi

    Forum for Education Studies, Vol.2, No.2, 2024; 41 Views, 15 PDF Downloads

    In the present age and time, there has been a research explosion, thus, a huge diversity in research and methods. Defining, characterizing, specializing, and isolating major and minor research and methodology diversity is very significant. Qualitative research, for example, is one of the two major research approaches. However, what makes qualitative research qualitative or what is qualitative in qualitative research is a crucial question for understanding qualitative research. This is especially true for novices in the field of qualitative research who depart with this fundamental question. Scholarly attention is, therefore, needed to address this question. Noticeably, there is scanty literature on a substantial overview that captures the unique features of qualitative research. This paper aims to present a literature survey of the defining characteristics and guiding principles of qualitative research. The authors have extensive experience in qualitative research. Based on their review, the paper outlines the commonly shared characteristics of qualitative research. In the current landscape of resulting research diversity, the highlights on the overview of qualitative research in the present paper are particularly pertinent especially for novice researchers entering the field.

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  • Open Access

    Article

    Article ID: 1137

    Empowering business school global presence: The key role of accreditation

    by Poh-Chuin Teo

    Forum for Education Studies, Vol.2, No.2, 2024; 11 Views, 8 PDF Downloads

    Delving into the crucial role of accreditation in elevating the global presence of business schools within higher education, the focus of the research shifts to highlighting the foundational impact of higher education institutions on intellectual, social, and economic development, exploring the integration of global perspectives in universities and colleges. The focus then shifts to business schools, detailing their diverse programs and mission to foster leadership and business acumen. Emphasizing intentional internationalization strategies like enhanced curricula and global partnerships, the paper underscores the transformative nature of this process aligned with the interconnected realities of the business world. Accreditation plays an influential role as a linchpin for collaboration, quality assurance, and global credibility, outlining key dimensions such as global recognition, benchmarking, collaboration, and diverse talent attraction. It concludes by asserting accreditation’s vital role as a compass guiding business school toward excellence and relevance in an interconnected world.

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  • Open Access

    Review

    Article ID: 543

    Assessment for employability: Is synoptic assessment the answer?

    by Alan Johnston, Lyn Johnston

    Forum for Education Studies, Vol.2, No.2, 2024; 61 Views, 31 PDF Downloads

    The production of job ready graduates remains one of the key requests of the business community. The purpose of this paper is to re-examine the importance of assessment in developing employability skills and in making graduates more employable. One criticism often levied at higher education institutions, is that students understand ideas in subject context, but cannot transfer that knowledge into a holistic business context. As such, they have silo ‘mentality’, when to be successful in the modern complex working and business environment they need to understand and command multiplicity. As a conceptual paper, this article seeks to discuss the importance and relevance of assessment and its links to employability. The paper provides a case for the inclusion of synoptic assessment as a tool for developing and demonstrating employability skills. The article emphasises the importance of employability and surrounding issues. The paper provides originality through linking the concepts of education and assessment with the end goals of job-readiness and employability. This paper argues for a new approach to assessment which is employability driven.

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  • Open Access

    Review

    Article ID: 384

    “Stumbling blocks” in the translation of technical documentation

    by Oksana Bielykh

    Forum for Education Studies, Vol.2, No.2, 2024; 21 Views, 11 PDF Downloads

    The objective of this study is to clarify the notion of “technical documentation” and explore the challenges and strategies involved in translating this type of text. Technical documentation is crucial in helping customers understand how to use the product effectively that is why it should be well-structured, allowing users to find the information they need quickly and easily. Examples of technical writing include technical manuals, operating instructions, scientific books, monographs, academic papers and articles, and patent translations. However, several obstacles can impede the translation process, potentially resulting in inaccuracies or misunderstandings. Common translation difficulties include untranslatable words, multiple-word meanings, differences in grammatical and syntactic systems, technical and specialized terminology, and “false friends.” The process of translation of such texts is intricate, involving the transfer of information from one language to another while considering cultural, linguistic, and contextual factors. While translating technical texts, the translator may encounter various obstacles, such as linguistic challenges, source text issues, expertise gaps, and realia. Improving the effectiveness of translating technical documentation involves a combination of best translation practices. Effective communication and collaborative efforts are crucial elements for project success. It is also important for professional translators to be vigilant and use the right resources to avoid common pitfalls and deliver high-quality. By combining these strategies, you can enhance the efficiency and accuracy of translating technical documentation, ensuring that the information is effectively communicated to a global audience.

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