Literature Forum (LF) is an international, peer-reviewed, open access journal on literature and cultural studies. JWL aspires to bring together scholars interested in developing the research of Literature, and to provide the most suitable environment for contributions from all the world’s literary traditions. The journal welcomes submissions that can concurrently imagine any literary tradition, moving beyond national frames to simultaneously discuss and develop the cosmopolitan threads of a variety of literary traditions.

Latest Articles

  • Open Access

    Original Research Articles

    Article ID: 159

    Chasing an impossible dream (First examples of literature on the area of Montenegro)

    by Vukota Vukotic

    Literature Forum, Vol.1, No.1, 2024; 53 Views, 88 PDF Downloads

    So little attention modern science in Montenegro gives to the problem of our oldest literature. Actually, we never know or exploit those boundaries. Our goal is to be objective and study the facts about the earliest form of literature in ancient province of Praevalitana, today Montenegro. Modern Montenegrin historiography attaches the beginning of literature for the novel of Andreacci from year 809 AD. That means that in one great period of time, more than half of millennium, we have no traces of written word in this area. For same period of time, we attach the foundation of antic town of Doclea, Roman government, creation of Praevalitana province, but also and start of Christianity, lack of traces of written words, seems impossible. Remains of material culture from the period of late antiquity, tell us about very developed culture, so our opinion is that we can say the same thing for literature.

    show more
  • Open Access

    Original Research Articles

    Article ID: 243

    Medium-conscious, self-standing literariness for diverse audiences in graphic novel adaptations of Alki Zei’s young adult novels

    by Evangelia Moula, Konstantinos Malafantis

    Literature Forum, Vol.1, No.1, 2024; 2340 Views, 66 PDF Downloads

    This paper aims to critically comment on two adaptations of literary works by the internationally recognized Greek author, Alki Zei, in graphic novels. The works under discussion are Peter’s Great Walk and Wildcat Under Glass . At first and as a prerequisite for understanding the proposed approach, the role of storytelling in today’s media-dependent world is discussed. This is followed by a brief reference to the relationship of literature to the graphic novel genre, and to the notion of cognitive complexity as central to the “literariness” of a graphic adaptation. The interpretative toolkit to be used for the analysis of the texts is then delivered and the works under consideration are briefly presented. In the main part of the analysis, more criteria of graphic novels’ literariness are introduced. A key criterion of the self-contained literary quality of the adaptations is graphitization, as it fruitfully intersects and cross-fertilizes the visual style with the heroes’ characterization and the prevailing mood of the story. “Iconic solidarity” and focalization are used in the same direction. Graphic counterparts of literary expressions or Figurative language are also sought and the “authentication” index of adaptations is examined as an indication of the intended readership. In conclusion, it is perceived that both adaptations, although staying true to their sources, meet the conditions of a genre-specific literariness, but also differ in the degree of cognitive complexity, to the point of addressing different reading audiences.

    show more
  • Open Access

    Original Research Articles

    Article ID: 499

    Exploring the intersection of literature and professional identity: A comparative study of a Vietnamese EFL teacher and the literary character Chi Pheo

    by Le Thanh Thao, Pham Trut Thuy

    Literature Forum, Vol.1, No.1, 2024; 52 Views, 46 PDF Downloads

    This study presents a unique exploration of the professional identity of a Vietnamese male teacher of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) through a comparative analysis with Chi Pheo, a character from Nam Cao’s Vietnamese literature. Conducted in the culturally rich Mekong Delta region, the research employs a qualitative case study methodology, utilizing in-depth interviews, classroom observations, and document analysis to delve into the intricate relationship between cultural narratives and educational practices. The findings reveal a complex professional identity marked by resilience, innovation, empathy, and a sophisticated balance between traditional and modern teaching methods. These characteristics, while showing parallels with Chi Pheo, particularly in terms of resilience and the quest for authenticity, also exhibit significant differences, most notably in the teacher’s constructive approach to challenges and commitment to student engagement. The study underscores the impact of cultural narratives on educational practices and highlights the dynamic nature of teacher identity in the Vietnamese context. It contributes to the literature on teacher identity by emphasizing the role of cultural and literary influences in shaping educational roles and practices. The research has implications for teacher training, curriculum development, and policy-making, advocating for approaches that are culturally responsive and pedagogically innovative. This investigation into the professional identity of a Vietnamese EFL teacher offers new perspectives on the interplay between literature, culture, and education, providing valuable insights for educators, policymakers, and researchers in the field of teacher identity and education.

    show more
View All Issues